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​Man Spends 20 Years Creating Huge Cave In Arctic

James Dawson in  now

Photos have emerged of an ice cave in the Arctic created by a sculptor from the USA.

Tim Linhart, from New Mexico, USA, has been carving ice for over 30 years. He started building frozen concert halls over a decade ago - and has filled his latest one with fully functional musical instruments made almost entirely of ice.

Tim carved carved a musical string bass completely from ice sitting on top of a mountain around 20 years ago, and decided to carve more. The only problem was he needed a space that would have a constant freezing temperature.

Watch footage of it here...

Credit: YouTube / Omeleto

He said: "I plucked on the wires and I heard the sound coming out from inside the instrument.

"And I was so excited by what I heard that I put on my skis and skied all the way down to the village and told them what had happened to me and how excited I was.

"They pretty much thought I was a kook.

"Well, on that day I sort of had a dream - a vision of what could one day become. Welcome to my dream."

Credit: YouTube / Omeleto

He chose the Swedish town of Lulea, which is located just below the Arctic Circle, as the location.

The cave he dug was specially designed to keep the delicate instruments cool - even when the concert hall is full of people.

Tim says: "You got hot bodies next to cold instruments and they're melting...the strings on the stringed instruments begin to get softer and the pitch goes down.

"On the pipe instruments [the pitch] begins to go up, so you've got the orchestra going in two different directions."

Ice cave with two domes in order to let out the heat of the audience and keep the instruments cold - meaning the venue can host entire gigs.

This isn't the only weird thing that's been going on lately involving ice structures...

Japanese Ice Sculptures Could Prove Aliens Exist

Thirty years ago, divers were looking for a good place to look for hammerhead sharks off the coast of Japan. But they came across something scarier than sharks and quite strange - giant steps under the sea.

Now known as the Yonaguni Monument, no one can agree on whether they're entirely natural, been modified by man, or made by man.

It does look like it's manmade - it's a mixture of mudstone and sandstone and it stands off the ground - it's huge at 490ft by 130ft and around 90ft high.

Masaaki Kimura, a Professor of Science at the University of the Rykukyus in Okinawa is adamant that it's manmade. He says that the formations are monoliths created by an ancient civilisation.

On the actual island of Yonaguni, Kimura notes that there are small camps, pottery, stone tools, and large fireplaces that date back to 2500 BCE. But that doesn't mean they had the knowledge to create monoliths.

But geologist Robert Schoch thinks it's entirely natural. If it were manmade, he argues, it would have to have been built when it was above the sea - and that would have been over 8,000 years ago before the Ice Age. It's simply not that old.

Secondly, the Yonaguni monument is made out of "solid living bedrock," according to Robert. He says: "No part of the monument is constructed of separate blocks of rock that have been placed into position."

"At at the surface, natural wave and tidal action is responsible for eroding and removing the sandstones in such a way that very regular step-like and terrace-like structures remain," he concluded.

But no one wants to believe him!

Some people think it's evidence of the lost continent of Mu. Amateur archaeologist Augustus Le Plongeon (great name) thought that Egyptians and Native Americans were actually refugees from Mu, a lost continent that he thought was bang smack in the middle of the Atlantic Ocean.

Not a huge amount of people believed him at the time, to be honest.

I can see why he thought there should be some land in the Atlantic - it is a huge body of water but look at it! Doesn't it look ridiculous!

Credit: My Mu

Other people think it must be aliens. Underwater aliens. This is not really a coherent argument as such - it's just that the Yonaguni Monument is a bit eerie to dive round and alien in that it's creepy and otherworldly. And when we can't quite explain something... aliens did it. 100 percent.

Featured Image Credit: Omeleto

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James Dawson

JD here chillin' 2k17.

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